Session View

Monday 14 April, Morning

10 Questions in virology

Claude Lévi-Strauss said “The scientist is not a person who gives the right answers, [s]he's one who asks the right questions.” Our goal for this symposium was to make it inclusive by using social media to ask as many people as possible to submit their burning questions in virology. Twitter, Facebook, virology blogs, email and podcasts attracted a plethora of diverse questions that spanned the breath of fundamental and applied virology. Ranging from, “Where do viruses come from?”, to “How do viruses spread?” and “Why don't we have a vaccine against HIV yet?”, an engaging and provocative group of speakers will try to answer these pertinent and challenging questions. Keynote lectures will be interleaved with offered papers from the best groups working in the UK on such diverse topics as virus discovery, systems biology and viral pathogenesis. A debate addressing reductionism and systems biology will be chaired by the winner of the Wildy Prize in Microbiology Education, Stephen Curry, an avid blogger, proponent of open access and an accomplished structural biologist.

Organisers

Paul Duprex (Virology Division) David Matthews

Cell cycle

The cell cycle is the vital ordered series of events by which one cell grows and divides into two daughter cells. This symposium brings together leaders in the field to showcase diverse areas of cell cycle biology in a broad spectrum of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. In addition to areas of longstanding interest in cell cycle regulation, such as initiation, checkpoint pathways, DNA replication and cytokinesis, areas of emerging interest including links between cell cycle regulation and morphogenesis/differentiation and environmental influences on cell cycle progression are also covered.

Organisers

Janet Quinn, Richard McCulloch and Petra Oyston

Metabolic engineering for biotechnology: fundamental knowledge to societal benefit

Microbiology underpins many different facets of biotechnology, including traditional practices like brewing and wine-making, production of antibiotics and pharmaceuticals, and applications in bioenergy and industrial chemistry. Regardless of the sector, modern biotechnology requires a deep understanding of the biology, genetics and metabolic pathways of the microbes involved. Biotechnology is the interface where fundamental knowledge meets opportunity for exploitation for societal and economic benefit. The fundamental knowledge is required because although microbes possess the underlying potential for applications, in most cases, this potential needs to be developed further to optimise and enhance the relevant traits of the microbe. Traditionally, this optimisation was carried out through mutation and selection, but modern molecular tools now allow us to do this in a much more selective and precise way by specifically remodelling pathways and processes of interest. This is termed metabolic engineering and is a methodology that is coming to the fore in bacteria, yeast, fungi and algae. Reprogamming pathways and engineering metabolism first requires understanding of pathways and enzymatic reactions, and then implementation of technologies to manipulate those same processes. This symposium has a focus on metabolic engineering of microbes for important applications: biofuels, drugs for treating disease, beverages and enzymes. The scope of the session will include bacteria, algae, yeast and fungi and so provides an overview of how comparable methodologies are used in different organisms for different applications. The potential for synthetic biology is also addressed in several talks. Given the economic importance and societal relevance of the applications discussed, the session should be of interest to any microbiologists or biotechnologists. Furthermore, although there is an emphasis on biotechnology, the underlying need for fundamental knowledge also features and most speakers will address how acquiring basic knowledge can also lead to exploitation. This is very relevant for microbiologists early in their careers as we operate in an era where there is increasing emphasis from funding bodies and others to provide justification for the research that we do and the knowledge we generate.

Organisers

John Morrisey, Ursula Bond, Elinor Thompson and Rocky Cranenburgh

Pseudomonas signalling, secretion and social interactions

Pseudomonads comprise a diverse group of animal, plant and environmental bacteria and can be viewed from pathogenic and beneficial perspectives. This symposium will bring together aspects of the complex regulatory systems that these bacteria use to communicate between each other and interact with other cells they come in contact with. To enable these versatile bacteria to establish themselves they secrete a wide range of molecules. Protein, lipopeptide and peptidoglycan localization will be presented to provide a platform to present a range of secretion machineries. It is becoming evident that the Pseudomonads are an ideal community in which to understand social interactions and the drivers behind evolution. How this dovetails with successful infection and the influences of metabolic regulation will be presented. To bring together the vibrant Pseudomomonas community the symposium includes a half day forum for early career scientists to present their work and stimulate discussion with the prominent invited speakers.

Organisers

Kim Hardie, Gail Preston and Kalai Mathee

Monday 14 April, Afternoon

10 Questions in virology

Claude Lévi-Strauss said “The scientist is not a person who gives the right answers, [s]he's one who asks the right questions.” Our goal for this symposium was to make it inclusive by using social media to ask as many people as possible to submit their burning questions in virology. Twitter, Facebook, virology blogs, email and podcasts attracted a plethora of diverse questions that spanned the breath of fundamental and applied virology. Ranging from, “Where do viruses come from?”, to “How do viruses spread?” and “Why don't we have a vaccine against HIV yet?”, an engaging and provocative group of speakers will try to answer these pertinent and challenging questions. Keynote lectures will be interleaved with offered papers from the best groups working in the UK on such diverse topics as virus discovery, systems biology and viral pathogenesis. A debate addressing reductionism and systems biology will be chaired by the winner of the Wildy Prize in Microbiology Education, Stephen Curry, an avid blogger, proponent of open access and an accomplished structural biologist.

Organisers

Paul Duprex (Virology Division) David Matthews

Cell cycle

The cell cycle is the vital ordered series of events by which one cell grows and divides into two daughter cells. This symposium brings together leaders in the field to showcase diverse areas of cell cycle biology in a broad spectrum of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. In addition to areas of longstanding interest in cell cycle regulation, such as initiation, checkpoint pathways, DNA replication and cytokinesis, areas of emerging interest including links between cell cycle regulation and morphogenesis/differentiation and environmental influences on cell cycle progression are also covered.

Organisers

Janet Quinn, Richard McCulloch and Petra Oyston

Metabolic engineering for biotechnology: fundamental knowledge to societal benefit

Microbiology underpins many different facets of biotechnology, including traditional practices like brewing and wine-making, production of antibiotics and pharmaceuticals, and applications in bioenergy and industrial chemistry. Regardless of the sector, modern biotechnology requires a deep understanding of the biology, genetics and metabolic pathways of the microbes involved. Biotechnology is the interface where fundamental knowledge meets opportunity for exploitation for societal and economic benefit. The fundamental knowledge is required because although microbes possess the underlying potential for applications, in most cases, this potential needs to be developed further to optimise and enhance the relevant traits of the microbe. Traditionally, this optimisation was carried out through mutation and selection, but modern molecular tools now allow us to do this in a much more selective and precise way by specifically remodelling pathways and processes of interest. This is termed metabolic engineering and is a methodology that is coming to the fore in bacteria, yeast, fungi and algae. Reprogamming pathways and engineering metabolism first requires understanding of pathways and enzymatic reactions, and then implementation of technologies to manipulate those same processes. This symposium has a focus on metabolic engineering of microbes for important applications: biofuels, drugs for treating disease, beverages and enzymes. The scope of the session will include bacteria, algae, yeast and fungi and so provides an overview of how comparable methodologies are used in different organisms for different applications. The potential for synthetic biology is also addressed in several talks. Given the economic importance and societal relevance of the applications discussed, the session should be of interest to any microbiologists or biotechnologists. Furthermore, although there is an emphasis on biotechnology, the underlying need for fundamental knowledge also features and most speakers will address how acquiring basic knowledge can also lead to exploitation. This is very relevant for microbiologists early in their careers as we operate in an era where there is increasing emphasis from funding bodies and others to provide justification for the research that we do and the knowledge we generate.

Organisers

John Morrisey, Ursula Bond, Elinor Thompson and Rocky Cranenburgh

Pseudomonas signalling, secretion and social interactions

Pseudomonads comprise a diverse group of animal, plant and environmental bacteria and can be viewed from pathogenic and beneficial perspectives. This symposium will bring together aspects of the complex regulatory systems that these bacteria use to communicate between each other and interact with other cells they come in contact with. To enable these versatile bacteria to establish themselves they secrete a wide range of molecules. Protein, lipopeptide and peptidoglycan localization will be presented to provide a platform to present a range of secretion machineries. It is becoming evident that the Pseudomonads are an ideal community in which to understand social interactions and the drivers behind evolution. How this dovetails with successful infection and the influences of metabolic regulation will be presented. To bring together the vibrant Pseudomomonas community the symposium includes a half day forum for early career scientists to present their work and stimulate discussion with the prominent invited speakers.

Organisers

Kim Hardie, Gail Preston and Kalai Mathee

Sexually transmitted and reproductive diseases in humans and animals

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are a long-standing and current health policy issue. Moreover, microbial infections are also a significant cause of reproductive health issues in animals, e.g. foetus malformation, abortion and infertility. This symposium will highlight recent advances in the knowledge and understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of infection and immunity in the genital and reproductive systems of humans and animals. The symposium will also address current trends in diagnostics, prevention and treatment options for antibiotic-resistant and sensitive infections.

Organisers

Geertje van Keulen, Gill Douce, Lucinda Hall (co-opted) and Nicola Rose

Tuesday 15 April, Morning

10 Questions in virology

Claude Lévi-Strauss said “The scientist is not a person who gives the right answers, [s]he's one who asks the right questions.” Our goal for this symposium was to make it inclusive by using social media to ask as many people as possible to submit their burning questions in virology. Twitter, Facebook, virology blogs, email and podcasts attracted a plethora of diverse questions that spanned the breath of fundamental and applied virology. Ranging from, “Where do viruses come from?”, to “How do viruses spread?” and “Why don't we have a vaccine against HIV yet?”, an engaging and provocative group of speakers will try to answer these pertinent and challenging questions. Keynote lectures will be interleaved with offered papers from the best groups working in the UK on such diverse topics as virus discovery, systems biology and viral pathogenesis. A debate addressing reductionism and systems biology will be chaired by the winner of the Wildy Prize in Microbiology Education, Stephen Curry, an avid blogger, proponent of open access and an accomplished structural biologist.

Organisers

Paul Duprex (Virology Division) David Matthews

Cell cycle

The cell cycle is the vital ordered series of events by which one cell grows and divides into two daughter cells. This symposium brings together leaders in the field to showcase diverse areas of cell cycle biology in a broad spectrum of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. In addition to areas of longstanding interest in cell cycle regulation, such as initiation, checkpoint pathways, DNA replication and cytokinesis, areas of emerging interest including links between cell cycle regulation and morphogenesis/differentiation and environmental influences on cell cycle progression are also covered.

Organisers

Janet Quinn, Richard McCulloch and Petra Oyston

Metabolic engineering for biotechnology: fundamental knowledge to societal benefit

Microbiology underpins many different facets of biotechnology, including traditional practices like brewing and wine-making, production of antibiotics and pharmaceuticals, and applications in bioenergy and industrial chemistry. Regardless of the sector, modern biotechnology requires a deep understanding of the biology, genetics and metabolic pathways of the microbes involved. Biotechnology is the interface where fundamental knowledge meets opportunity for exploitation for societal and economic benefit. The fundamental knowledge is required because although microbes possess the underlying potential for applications, in most cases, this potential needs to be developed further to optimise and enhance the relevant traits of the microbe. Traditionally, this optimisation was carried out through mutation and selection, but modern molecular tools now allow us to do this in a much more selective and precise way by specifically remodelling pathways and processes of interest. This is termed metabolic engineering and is a methodology that is coming to the fore in bacteria, yeast, fungi and algae. Reprogamming pathways and engineering metabolism first requires understanding of pathways and enzymatic reactions, and then implementation of technologies to manipulate those same processes. This symposium has a focus on metabolic engineering of microbes for important applications: biofuels, drugs for treating disease, beverages and enzymes. The scope of the session will include bacteria, algae, yeast and fungi and so provides an overview of how comparable methodologies are used in different organisms for different applications. The potential for synthetic biology is also addressed in several talks. Given the economic importance and societal relevance of the applications discussed, the session should be of interest to any microbiologists or biotechnologists. Furthermore, although there is an emphasis on biotechnology, the underlying need for fundamental knowledge also features and most speakers will address how acquiring basic knowledge can also lead to exploitation. This is very relevant for microbiologists early in their careers as we operate in an era where there is increasing emphasis from funding bodies and others to provide justification for the research that we do and the knowledge we generate.

Organisers

John Morrisey, Ursula Bond, Elinor Thompson and Rocky Cranenburgh

Pseudomonas signalling, secretion and social interactions

Pseudomonads comprise a diverse group of animal, plant and environmental bacteria and can be viewed from pathogenic and beneficial perspectives. This symposium will bring together aspects of the complex regulatory systems that these bacteria use to communicate between each other and interact with other cells they come in contact with. To enable these versatile bacteria to establish themselves they secrete a wide range of molecules. Protein, lipopeptide and peptidoglycan localization will be presented to provide a platform to present a range of secretion machineries. It is becoming evident that the Pseudomonads are an ideal community in which to understand social interactions and the drivers behind evolution. How this dovetails with successful infection and the influences of metabolic regulation will be presented. To bring together the vibrant Pseudomomonas community the symposium includes a half day forum for early career scientists to present their work and stimulate discussion with the prominent invited speakers.

Organisers

Kim Hardie, Gail Preston and Kalai Mathee

Sexually transmitted and reproductive diseases in humans and animals

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are a long-standing and current health policy issue. Moreover, microbial infections are also a significant cause of reproductive health issues in animals, e.g. foetus malformation, abortion and infertility. This symposium will highlight recent advances in the knowledge and understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of infection and immunity in the genital and reproductive systems of humans and animals. The symposium will also address current trends in diagnostics, prevention and treatment options for antibiotic-resistant and sensitive infections.

Organisers

Geertje van Keulen, Gill Douce, Lucinda Hall (co-opted) and Nicola Rose

Tuesday 15 April, Afternoon

10 Questions in virology

Claude Lévi-Strauss said “The scientist is not a person who gives the right answers, [s]he's one who asks the right questions.” Our goal for this symposium was to make it inclusive by using social media to ask as many people as possible to submit their burning questions in virology. Twitter, Facebook, virology blogs, email and podcasts attracted a plethora of diverse questions that spanned the breath of fundamental and applied virology. Ranging from, “Where do viruses come from?”, to “How do viruses spread?” and “Why don't we have a vaccine against HIV yet?”, an engaging and provocative group of speakers will try to answer these pertinent and challenging questions. Keynote lectures will be interleaved with offered papers from the best groups working in the UK on such diverse topics as virus discovery, systems biology and viral pathogenesis. A debate addressing reductionism and systems biology will be chaired by the winner of the Wildy Prize in Microbiology Education, Stephen Curry, an avid blogger, proponent of open access and an accomplished structural biologist.

Organisers

Paul Duprex (Virology Division) David Matthews

Cell cycle

The cell cycle is the vital ordered series of events by which one cell grows and divides into two daughter cells. This symposium brings together leaders in the field to showcase diverse areas of cell cycle biology in a broad spectrum of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms. In addition to areas of longstanding interest in cell cycle regulation, such as initiation, checkpoint pathways, DNA replication and cytokinesis, areas of emerging interest including links between cell cycle regulation and morphogenesis/differentiation and environmental influences on cell cycle progression are also covered.

Organisers

Janet Quinn, Richard McCulloch and Petra Oyston

Metabolic engineering for biotechnology: fundamental knowledge to societal benefit

Microbiology underpins many different facets of biotechnology, including traditional practices like brewing and wine-making, production of antibiotics and pharmaceuticals, and applications in bioenergy and industrial chemistry. Regardless of the sector, modern biotechnology requires a deep understanding of the biology, genetics and metabolic pathways of the microbes involved. Biotechnology is the interface where fundamental knowledge meets opportunity for exploitation for societal and economic benefit. The fundamental knowledge is required because although microbes possess the underlying potential for applications, in most cases, this potential needs to be developed further to optimise and enhance the relevant traits of the microbe. Traditionally, this optimisation was carried out through mutation and selection, but modern molecular tools now allow us to do this in a much more selective and precise way by specifically remodelling pathways and processes of interest. This is termed metabolic engineering and is a methodology that is coming to the fore in bacteria, yeast, fungi and algae. Reprogamming pathways and engineering metabolism first requires understanding of pathways and enzymatic reactions, and then implementation of technologies to manipulate those same processes. This symposium has a focus on metabolic engineering of microbes for important applications: biofuels, drugs for treating disease, beverages and enzymes. The scope of the session will include bacteria, algae, yeast and fungi and so provides an overview of how comparable methodologies are used in different organisms for different applications. The potential for synthetic biology is also addressed in several talks. Given the economic importance and societal relevance of the applications discussed, the session should be of interest to any microbiologists or biotechnologists. Furthermore, although there is an emphasis on biotechnology, the underlying need for fundamental knowledge also features and most speakers will address how acquiring basic knowledge can also lead to exploitation. This is very relevant for microbiologists early in their careers as we operate in an era where there is increasing emphasis from funding bodies and others to provide justification for the research that we do and the knowledge we generate.

Organisers

John Morrisey, Ursula Bond, Elinor Thompson and Rocky Cranenburgh

Pseudomonas signalling, secretion and social interactions

Pseudomonads comprise a diverse group of animal, plant and environmental bacteria and can be viewed from pathogenic and beneficial perspectives. This symposium will bring together aspects of the complex regulatory systems that these bacteria use to communicate between each other and interact with other cells they come in contact with. To enable these versatile bacteria to establish themselves they secrete a wide range of molecules. Protein, lipopeptide and peptidoglycan localization will be presented to provide a platform to present a range of secretion machineries. It is becoming evident that the Pseudomonads are an ideal community in which to understand social interactions and the drivers behind evolution. How this dovetails with successful infection and the influences of metabolic regulation will be presented. To bring together the vibrant Pseudomomonas community the symposium includes a half day forum for early career scientists to present their work and stimulate discussion with the prominent invited speakers.

Organisers

Kim Hardie, Gail Preston and Kalai Mathee

Sexually transmitted and reproductive diseases in humans and animals

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are a long-standing and current health policy issue. Moreover, microbial infections are also a significant cause of reproductive health issues in animals, e.g. foetus malformation, abortion and infertility. This symposium will highlight recent advances in the knowledge and understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of infection and immunity in the genital and reproductive systems of humans and animals. The symposium will also address current trends in diagnostics, prevention and treatment options for antibiotic-resistant and sensitive infections.

Organisers

Geertje van Keulen, Gill Douce, Lucinda Hall (co-opted) and Nicola Rose

Wednesday 16 April, Morning

Environmental microbiology forum

Offered papers will be welcome in any area of microbial ecology, symbiotic and non-pathogenic plant-microbe interactions, community structures and interactions, aquatic- and geo-microbiology, extremophiles, biodegradation, bioremediation, biodiversity and prokaryote evolution.

Organisers

Julian Marchesi and Graeme Nicol

Prokaryotic microbial infection forum

Offered papers will be welcome in any area related to infections caused by prokaryotes of human, veterinary or botanical significance including epidemiology, diagnosis, identification, typing, pathogenesis, treatment, antimicrobial agents and resistance, prevention, virulence factors, host responses and immunity, transmission, and models of infection at the cell, tissue or whole organism level. Papers on interactions between non-pathogenic prokaryotes or indigenous microbiota and the host will also be welcome.

Organisers

Gill Douce, Petra Oyston

Virology workshop: Clinical virology

Virology workshop: DNA viruses

This workshop covers all aspects of DNA virology.  It will be structured around the typical life-cycle of the viruses and will start with pathogenesis, to focus attendees on the diversity of the diseases caused by these viruses. The sessions will then move to virus entry, uncoating, replication, transcription, assembly/structure and egress. Human and animal pathogens will be covered and there will be the opportunity for clinicians to present studies on ongoing outbreaks or epidemiological data.  Cellular immunology studies will help to illustrate how these viruses interact and abrogate immune responses. Finally applied aspects of DNA virology such as vaccination, antiviral or gene therapeutic approaches will illustrate how these viruses are being harnessed for treatment of disease.

Organisers

Sally Roberts, David Matthews, Michelle West, James Stewart

Virology workshop: Negative strand RNA viruses

Negative strand viruses are a large and diverse group of viruses that includes many emerging and re-emerging pathogens, but also the agents of classical diseases of humans, animals and plants. We will welcome abstracts on any aspect from structure and replication to virus-cell interactions and host responses. We encourage authors wishing to submit abstracts on negative strand viruses regarded as respiratory viruses to also consider submitting their abstract to the workshop that accompanies the special symposium 'Viruses in the Respiratory Tract'.

Organisers

Janet Daly, Alain Kohl, (Virology Division)

Virology workshop: Positive strand RNA viruses

The workshop will encompass all aspects of positive sense RNA virology. It will include pathogenesis, illustrating the range of diseases caused by viruses with a positive sense genome and all aspects of the lifecycle i.e. virus entry, uncoating, translation, replication, assembly and egress. The workshop will aim to cover human, animal and plant viruses and also include data of clinical relevance as well as novel vaccination and antiviral strategies. The interaction between these viruses and the host cell will also be included, especially interactions with the host immune response.

Organisers

Adrian Fox, Nicola Stonehouse and David Evans

Virology workshop: Retroviruses

Abstract submission is now invited for this workshop. The aim of the session is to promote discussion of current research in any area of Retrovirology, including vaccinology. Students and post-doctoral scientists are particularly encouraged to present their data. Abstracts should be a maximum of 200 words excluding title. The presenting author’s name should be indicated and their e-mail address included. Please send abstracts to csa21@st-andrews.ac.uk or nicola.rose@nibsc.org. Please be aware that in the event of over-subscription it may be necessary to offer an alternative workshop session or a poster presentation.

Organisers

Nicola Rose and Catherine Adamson

Wednesday 16 April, Afternoon

Virology workshop: DNA viruses

This workshop covers all aspects of DNA virology.  It will be structured around the typical life-cycle of the viruses and will start with pathogenesis, to focus attendees on the diversity of the diseases caused by these viruses. The sessions will then move to virus entry, uncoating, replication, transcription, assembly/structure and egress. Human and animal pathogens will be covered and there will be the opportunity for clinicians to present studies on ongoing outbreaks or epidemiological data.  Cellular immunology studies will help to illustrate how these viruses interact and abrogate immune responses. Finally applied aspects of DNA virology such as vaccination, antiviral or gene therapeutic approaches will illustrate how these viruses are being harnessed for treatment of disease.

Organisers

Sally Roberts, David Matthews, Michelle West, James Stewart

Virology workshop: Positive strand RNA viruses

The workshop will encompass all aspects of positive sense RNA virology. It will include pathogenesis, illustrating the range of diseases caused by viruses with a positive sense genome and all aspects of the lifecycle i.e. virus entry, uncoating, translation, replication, assembly and egress. The workshop will aim to cover human, animal and plant viruses and also include data of clinical relevance as well as novel vaccination and antiviral strategies. The interaction between these viruses and the host cell will also be included, especially interactions with the host immune response.

Organisers

Adrian Fox, Nicola Stonehouse and David Evans

Prokaryotic cell biology forum

This forum will consider all fundamental aspects of the physiology, biochemistry and structure of prokaryotic cells. This includes metabolism, synthesis and transport of macromolecules, membrane transport of ions and small molecules, the cell cycle, cell architecture, differentiation, sensing and cellular responses, signalling and communication, bioenergetics and the structure, function and mode of action of microbial factors. Papers on the engineering and applications of microbes will also be welcome.

Organisers

Gail Preston and Sandra Macfarlane

Prokaryotic genetics forum

Offered papers on all aspects of the genes and genomes of prokaryotes and their mobile elements will be considered, including their sequencing, transcription, translation, regulation, chromosome dynamics, gene transfer, population genetics and evolution, taxonomy and systematics, comparative genomics, metagenomics, bioinformatics, and synthetic biology.

Organisers

Nick Thompson and Ross Fitzgerald

Virology workshop: Negative strand RNA viruses

Negative strand viruses are a large and diverse group of viruses that includes many emerging and re-emerging pathogens, but also the agents of classical diseases of humans, animals and plants. We will welcome abstracts on any aspect from structure and replication to virus-cell interactions and host responses. We encourage authors wishing to submit abstracts on negative strand viruses regarded as respiratory viruses to also consider submitting their abstract to the workshop that accompanies the special symposium 'Viruses in the Respiratory Tract'.

Organisers

Janet Daly, Alain Kohl, (Virology Division)

Virology workshop: Respiratory viruses

This workshop accompanies the virus symposium taking place on Thursday 17 April ‘Viruses in the Respiratory Tract’. Short talks on any aspect of virus infection of respiratory tract will be presented, including talks on RSV, rhinovirus and influenza.

Organisers

Wendy Barclay

Virology workshop: Retroviruses

Abstract submission is now invited for this workshop. The aim of the session is to promote discussion of current research in any area of Retrovirology, including vaccinology. Students and post-doctoral scientists are particularly encouraged to present their data. Abstracts should be a maximum of 200 words excluding title. The presenting author’s name should be indicated and their e-mail address included. Please send abstracts to csa21@st-andrews.ac.uk or nicola.rose@nibsc.org. Please be aware that in the event of over-subscription it may be necessary to offer an alternative workshop session or a poster presentation.

Organisers

Nicola Rose and Catherine Adamson

Thursday 17 April, Morning

Evolution of microbial populations within the host

The evolution of microbial populations during infection is central to their capacity to adapt to different anatomical niches, evade the host immune system, and overcome therapeutic challenges. For example, antimicrobial treatment may fail due to the development of resistance during bacterial infection, which is often accompanied by transition to a less virulent state during chronic, persistent infection. Traditionally, single clinical isolates have been taken to be representative of infecting populations of bacteria but recent studies employing deep sequencing techniques have revealed considerable diversity among bacterial populations derived from single or closely-related infecting strains. We now have the capacity to address previously intractable questions regarding bacterial diversification and adaptation during infection which will ultimately lead to enhanced understanding of pathogenesis and the nature of epidemics, and will inform the design of effective therapeutic measures. In this symposium, investigators at the forefront of this burgeoning new field will present the latest research and lead discussion on its importance and potential applications.

Organisers

Ross Fitzgerald, Nick Thompson and Johanna Jeffries

Viruses in the respiratory tract

Viruses that transmit via the respiratory route are among the most common acute infections in man and other mammals. It is estimated that every human will experience 2-3 colds per year; that adds up to us spending 2-3 years of our lives with a cold. Ranging from the common cold to Spanish influenza that claimed more than 40 million lives in the pandemic of 1918, respiratory viral infections claim headlines: recent research into influenza transmission resulted in a moratorium; and the new MERS coronavirus carries a high case fatality rate in the handful of people infected so far, worryingly reminiscent of the SARS outbreak of 2003. This symposium will take a closer look at the respiratory tract as a site for viral replication, look into how viruses pass through the air and ask why respiratory viruses cause such a wide range of disease outcomes.

Organisers

Wendy Barclay

Thursday 17 April, Afternoon

Evolution of microbial populations within the host

The evolution of microbial populations during infection is central to their capacity to adapt to different anatomical niches, evade the host immune system, and overcome therapeutic challenges. For example, antimicrobial treatment may fail due to the development of resistance during bacterial infection, which is often accompanied by transition to a less virulent state during chronic, persistent infection. Traditionally, single clinical isolates have been taken to be representative of infecting populations of bacteria but recent studies employing deep sequencing techniques have revealed considerable diversity among bacterial populations derived from single or closely-related infecting strains. We now have the capacity to address previously intractable questions regarding bacterial diversification and adaptation during infection which will ultimately lead to enhanced understanding of pathogenesis and the nature of epidemics, and will inform the design of effective therapeutic measures. In this symposium, investigators at the forefront of this burgeoning new field will present the latest research and lead discussion on its importance and potential applications.

Organisers

Ross Fitzgerald, Nick Thompson and Johanna Jeffries

RNA and riboswitches in bacterial regulation

Our understanding of bacterial regulation has been transformed in recent years by the discovery of non-protein based mechanisms. It has become apparent that RNA plays a significant role in controlling bacterial processes. This session will look at the recent progress that has been made in understanding some of these RNA-based regulatory mechanisms, the new paradigms that are emerging, and the development of technologies to facilitate their study.

Organisers

Petra Oyston

Viruses in the respiratory tract

Viruses that transmit via the respiratory route are among the most common acute infections in man and other mammals. It is estimated that every human will experience 2-3 colds per year; that adds up to us spending 2-3 years of our lives with a cold. Ranging from the common cold to Spanish influenza that claimed more than 40 million lives in the pandemic of 1918, respiratory viral infections claim headlines: recent research into influenza transmission resulted in a moratorium; and the new MERS coronavirus carries a high case fatality rate in the handful of people infected so far, worryingly reminiscent of the SARS outbreak of 2003. This symposium will take a closer look at the respiratory tract as a site for viral replication, look into how viruses pass through the air and ask why respiratory viruses cause such a wide range of disease outcomes.

Organisers

Wendy Barclay

Lecture View

Monday 14 April, Morning

Monday 14 April, Afternoon

Tuesday 15 April, Morning

Tuesday 15 April, Afternoon

Wednesday 16 April, Morning

Wednesday 16 April, Afternoon

Thursday 17 April, Morning