• Sensitisation of Clostridoides difficile to phage infection

    January 23, 2020

    Each year, the Microbiology Society awards a number of grants that enable undergraduates to work on microbiological research projects during the summer vacation. Over the next few months, we’ll be posting a series of articles from members who were awarded Harry Smith Vacation Studentships this summer. This week is Annie Clarke, a final year Biomedical Science student at the University of Hertfordshire.

  • The Microbiology Society Roadshow in Dublin

    January 22, 2020

    On 23 October last year, Professor Judith Armitage, President of the Microbiology Society visited Trinity College Dublin as part of the President's Roadshow programme of events. Third year undergraduate Miruna Iancu attended the roadshow. Here, Miruna discusses the event.

  • Bridging the clinical-research gap

    January 20, 2020

    The Microbiology Society and the Healthcare Infection Society (HIS) co-hosted a collaborative one-day workshop, titled ‘Bridging the clinical-research gap’ in London on 21 November 2019. The aim of this event was to bring academic and clinical microbiologists together to find ways to collaborate meaningfully, with an ultimate goal of improving the translation of research in infection prevention and control. Here, Dr Karen Robinson discusses her experience at the event.

  • A faster way to determine antimicrobial susceptibility

    January 16, 2020

    It can take as long as five days to determine which antibiotic treatments are likely to be effective in clearing a bacterial infection. These long wait-times can lead to ineffective antibiotics being used, delaying patient recovery and contributing to the increase of antimicrobial resistance. But is there a better way? In this blog, Kerry Falconer PhD student at the University of St Andrews discusses her research.

  • New microbes discovered in a red fox, homemade kefir and a tick

    January 14, 2020

    Each month, the Microbiology Society publishes the International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology (IJSEM), which details newly discovered species of bacteria, fungi and protists. Here are some of the new species that have been discovered and the places they’ve been found.

  • DNA and Diversity

    January 13, 2020

    As part of Biology Week last year, Microbiology Society Champion Dr Linda Oyama took some time out from caring for her 8-week-old twins to teach primary school girls about DNA along with a team of female scientists from Queen's University, Belfast. Here, Linda reflects on the day.

  • Microbe Talk: GlobalseaweedSTAR – microbiology's role in the seaweed industry

    January 10, 2020

    For countries like Malaysia, Tanzania and the Philippines, seaweed agriculture is a major industry. However, these countries still see significant crop losses due to disease and pests. So what role does microbiology have in helping these countries’ growth in the industry?

  • How could supervising a studentship benefit your professional development?

    January 7, 2020

    Each year, the Microbiology Society awards a number of grants that enable undergraduates to work on microbiological research projects during the summer vacation. Over the next few months, we’ll be posting a series of articles from members who were awarded Harry Smith Vacation Studentships this summer. This week focuses on some of our members who supervised students during their summer projects.

  • Best of the journals 2019

    January 3, 2020

    We've already covered the most-read blog posts from 2019 and now it is time to re-cap some of the most downloaded articles from the Microbiology Society’s journals and the amazing science that was published in 2019.

  • Microbiology Editor’s Choice: the fitness costs of rapid plasmid evolution

    January 2, 2020

    Each month, a manuscript published in our flagship journal Microbiology is chosen by a member of the Editorial Board. This month, the paper is titled “Extremely fast amelioration of plasmid fitness costs by multiple functionally diverse pathways” and it was chosen by Dr Isabelle Martin-Verstraete.