• A Sustainable Future: Soil Health Policy Report

    17 December 2020 publication

    Soils are critically important to the functioning and sustainability of the planet. They provide a range of essential functions, including producing the vast majority of our food, filtering our water and regulating climate. Most of these functions are underpinned by micro-organisms, making the knowledge of how they work of vital importance. In spite of this, soils are being degraded at an alarming rate. Twenty-four billion tons of fertile soil are annually lost from agricultural systems worldwide and it is estimated that 60-70% of EU soils are unhealthy.

  • A Sustainable Future: Antimicrobial Resistance Policy Report

    17 December 2020 publication

    AMR is a slow-moving pandemic, which already causes at least 70,000 deaths a year globally. Unchecked, the impact of AMR will continue to grow and has the potential to become the greatest future threat to human health and well-being. 

  • A Sustainable Future: Project Statement

    17 December 2020 publication

    The United Nations 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), including “good health and well-being”, “gender equality” and “affordable and clean energy”, build on the success of the Millennium Development Goals to cement hundreds of years of incremental human progress with the support of a strong international community. The global goals are a universal call to action to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure that all people enjoy peace and prosperity. Many of the steps that will be taken on the long road towards achieving the SDGs will involve outputs from microbiological research. The major policy decisions needed to set us on this journey require knowledge of relevant microbial activities and how these can be channelled for the greater benefit. 

  • A Sustainable Future: Circular Economy Policy Report

    17 December 2020 publication

    Exploitation of material resources and increased pressure on natural ecosystems have raised concerns over potential future resource risk and supply failures worldwide. In recent years, interest in a circular model that looks beyond the current linear ‘take-make-dispose’ industrial model has surged among scientists, policy makers and business actors. The circular economy is based on the principles of designing out waste and pollution, keeping products and materials in use, and regenerating natural systems.  

  • From the Chief Executive

    20 October 2020 article

  • Public perceptions of medical mycology

    20 October 2020 article

  • Increasingly Open: half year results

    20 October 2020 article

  • Spotlight on Grants: Research Visit Grant

    20 October 2020 article

  • 75 years on: a brief update on the history of the Microbiology Society: Part 2

    20 October 2020 article

  • The National Collection of Type Cultures Centenary: 100 years of supporting science

    20 October 2020 article

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