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Overview

The Microbiology Society are delighted to be hosting the Federation of Infection Societies Conference 2019 (FIS 2019) in Edinburgh between 11–14 November 2019.

This event is a unique conference which includes the collaboration of 16 societies across the UK with interests in different aspects of infectious diseases, clinical microbiology, biomedical science and infection control and provides a great opportunity to find out about the latest developments and to connect with key contacts and networks.

The event will attract over 600 delegates bringing together some of the best and most thoughtful minds from around the world to participate and inform.

FIS 2019 is being held at the Edinburgh International Conference Centre (EICC) and over 4 days will see a programme packed with sessions covering the most important current issues facing infectious disease control, prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

Chair and Chair Elect of the organising committee

Chair: Professor Sheila Patrick (Queen’s University Belfast, UK)
Chair Elect: Professor Craig Williams (University of the West of Scotland, UK)

Confirmed sessions 

(Further announcements to be made)

  • Antimicrobial prophylaxis the impact of resistance
  • Stewardship and diabetic foot infection
  • Things that go bump in the night
  • Point of care
  • Diagnosis and prevention – biofilms
  • Use of antimicrobials at the end of life
  • Neglected tropical diseases
  • Zoonoses: so many ways to become infected
  • Clinical lessons
  • Bid data and future of IPC
  • The human microbiota in health and disease
  • Use of aminoglycosides – benefits and adverse effects
  • Travel medicine
  • Vaccine preventable disease
  • Anaerobes
  • Antimicrobial stewardship-the next steps

Confirmed Professional Development sessions

  • Collaboration catalyst
  • Infectious disease futures: trainee scientist spotlight
  • Demystifying RCPATH exams

FIS member Societies organising sessions at this year’s event

(Further announcements to be made)

 

You can stay up to date and join the conversation by following us on Twitter @MicrobioSoc #FIS19.

Any questions or enquiries please email conferences@microbiologysociety.org

Programme

Type

Session

Session View

Tuesday 12 November, Morning

Antimicrobial prophylaxis: the impact of resistance - Part 1

This session is being organised by the UKCPA - Clinical Pharmacy Association and the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

In addressing the antimicrobial resistance challenge, ensuring we have strategies to address antimicrobial prophylaxis as well as treatment is important.

This session will focus on the agents used in antimicrobial prophylaxis, their role in medical and surgical disease areas and the challenges and consequences of inappropriate use. The session will focus on good practice examples together with linking to the new 2019/20 antimicrobial CQUIN.

Organisers

Tejal Vaghela (Watford General Hospital, UK) and Dr Mark Gilchrist (Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, UK)

Point of care - Part 1

This session is being organised by the Scottish Microbiology Association

Further information to follow.

Organisers

Stewardship and diabetic foot infection: “the right antibiotic, at the right dose at the right time” – and the right surgery - Part 1

This session is organised by the Healthcare Infection Society

The burden of diabetic foot infections (DFI) presents many challenges. Infection relapse is common, often with increasingly resistant organisms. There is no clearly superior strategy to tackle the infective problems. The patients are heterogeneous with varying presentations.

Here we present the evolution of an MDT-driven orthopaedic surgical approach utilising local antibiotic delivery via calcium sulphate cement.

We will discuss the approach developed to sampling, surgery and antibiotic delivery. A large case-series of over 90 patients will be reported on, with outcomes. The wider ‘spin-off’ benefits in terms of infection prevention and control and antimicrobial stewardship, will be explored. From the same centre, we will contrast with a clinician-led approach, using prolonged IV antibiotics largely via OPAT, with the aim of avoiding the need of surgery. As well as case selection for oral antibiotics in osteomyelitis of DFI.

Organisers

David Harvey (HIS)

Things that go bump in the night - dealing with the out of hours paediatric call! - Part 1

This session is being organised by the British Paediatric Allergy Immunity and Infection Group

Back by popular demand after the success of their sessions in 2017 and 2018, Sanjay and Stephane will be presenting interactive paediatric cases not dissimilar to those that may be encountered by microbiologists and adult ID specialists!

Organisers

Sanjay Patel (Southampton Children’s Hospital, UK) and Stephane Paulus (Oxford Children’s Hospital and Conveyor of BPAIIG, UK)

Antimicrobial prophylaxis: the impact of resistance part 2

This session is being organised by the UKCPA - Clinical Pharmacy Association and the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

In addressing the antimicrobial resistance challenge, ensuring we have strategies to address antimicrobial prophylaxis as well as treatment is important.

This session will focus on the agents used in antimicrobial prophylaxis, their role in medical and surgical disease areas and the challenges and consequences of inappropriate use. The session will focus on good practice examples together with linking to the new 2019/20 antimicrobial CQUIN.

Organisers

Tejal Vaghela (Watford General Hospital, UK) and Dr Mark Gilchrist (Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, UK)

Point of Care - Part 2

This session is being organised by the Scottish Microbiology Association

Further information to follow.

Organisers

Stewardship and diabetic foot infection: “the right antibiotic, at the right dose at the right time” – and the right surgery - Part 2

This session is organised by the Healthcare Infection Society

The burden of diabetic foot infections (DFI) presents many challenges. Infection relapse is common, often with increasingly resistant organisms. There is no clearly superior strategy to tackle the infective problems. The patients are heterogeneous with varying presentations.

Here we present the evolution of an MDT-driven orthopaedic surgical approach utilising local antibiotic delivery via calcium sulphate cement.

We will discuss the approach developed to sampling, surgery and antibiotic delivery. A large case-series of over 90 patients will be reported on, with outcomes. The wider ‘spin-off’ benefits in terms of infection prevention and control and antimicrobial stewardship, will be explored.

From the same centre, we will contrast with a clinician-led approach, using prolonged IV antibiotics largely via OPAT, with the aim of avoiding the need of surgery. As well as case selection for oral antibiotics in osteomyelitis of DFI.

Organisers

David Harvey Wirral (University Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, UK)

Things that go bump in the night - dealing with the out of hours paediatric call! - Part 2

This session is being organised by the British Paediatric Allergy Immunity and Infection Group

Back by popular demand after the success of their sessions in 2017 and 2018, Sanjay and Stephane will be presenting interactive paediatric cases not dissimilar to those that may be encountered by microbiologists and adult ID specialists!

Organisers

Sanjay Patel (Southampton Children’s Hospital, UK) and Stephane Paulus (Oxford Children’s Hospital and Conveyor of BPAIIG, UK)

Tuesday 12 November, Afternoon

Challenging biofilm infection diagnosis - Part 1

This session is being organised by the Microbiology Society

The diagnosis and treatment of biofilm infection, particularly in the orthopaedic setting, remains a challenge. Surgical wound contamination from patient’s skin can not only be a cause of biofilm infection but has the potential to confound diagnosis of chronic infection. The current guidelines on the diagnosis and subsequent treatment of implant biofilm infection will be addressed and debated. Offered papers relating to any aspect of biofilm infection will be considered for oral presentation within the symposium.

Organisers

Professor Sheila Patrick (Queen’s University Belfast, UK) and Professor Craig Williams (University of the West of Scotland, UK)

Neglected tropical diseases - Part 1

This session is being organised by the British Infection Association

Further information to follow.

Organisers

Hiten Thaker (Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust, UK)

Use of antimicrobials at the end of life - Part 1

This session is being organised by the UKCPA - Clinical Pharmacy Association and the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

This session will explore the antimicrobial stewardship considerations during end of life care and will focus specifically on the approach to decision making, risk and benefits to initiating treatment and a patient perspective.

The session will also help inform the audience and healthcare users around this sometimes challenging situation.

Organisers

Tejal Vaghela (Watford General Hospital, UK) and Dr Mark Gilchrist (Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, UK)

Zoonoses: so many ways to become infected - Part 1

This session is being organised by the Scottish Microbiology Association

Around 75% of human pathogens have an animal origin. Ecological and evolutionary changes can have significant impacts on zoonotic infections, with many emerging, re-emerging or increasing in importance and this session will cover a diverse range of some of these. The invited speakers will focus on zoonoses associated with three very different sources – Lyme disease, increasing risks from the handling of raw pet food and organisms encountered following bite-wounds and other zoonotic infections from marine mammals.

Organisers

Professor Andrew Smith (University of Glasgow, UK) and Dr Geoffrey Foster (Scotland’s Rural College, UK)

Challenging Biofilm Infection Diagnosis - Part 2

This session is being organised by the Microbiology Society

The diagnosis and treatment of biofilm infection, particularly in the orthopaedic setting, remains a challenge. Surgical wound contamination from patient’s skin can not only be a cause of biofilm infection but has the potential to confound diagnosis of chronic infection. The current guidelines on the diagnosis and subsequent treatment of implant biofilm infection will be addressed and debated. Offered papers relating to any aspect of biofilm infection will be considered for oral presentation within the symposium.

Organisers

Professor Sheila Patrick (Queen’s University Belfast, UK) and Professor Craig Williams (University of the West of Scotland, UK)

Neglected Tropical Diseases - Part 2

This session is being organised by the British Infection Association

Further information to follow.

Organisers

Hiten Thaker (Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust, UK)

Use of Antimicrobials at the end of life - Part 2

This session is being organised by the UKCPA - Clinical Pharmacy Association and the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

This session will explore the antimicrobial stewardship considerations during end of life care and will focus specifically on the approach to decision making, risk and benefits to initiating treatment and a patient perspective.

The session will also help inform the audience and healthcare users around this sometimes challenging situation.

Organisers

Tejal Vaghela (Watford General Hospital, UK) and Dr Mark Gilchrist (Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, UK)

Zoonoses: so many ways to become infected - Part 2

This session is being organised by the Scottish Microbiology Association

Around 75% of human pathogens have an animal origin. Ecological and evolutionary changes can have significant impacts on zoonotic infections, with many emerging, re-emerging or increasing in importance and this session will cover a diverse range of some of these. The invited speakers will focus on zoonoses associated with three very different sources – Lyme disease, increasing risks from the handling of raw pet food and organisms encountered following bite-wounds and other zoonotic infections from marine mammals.

Organisers

Professor Andrew Smith (University of Glasgow, UK) and Dr Geoffrey Foster (Scotland’s Rural College, UK)

Wednesday 13 November, Morning

Big data and the future of IPC (generalised theme) - Part 1

This session is being organised by the Healthcare Infection Society

The accessibility of Big Data in healthcare has opened the door to a wide variety of possibilities for infection prevention control and in antimicrobial stewardship. The drive towards digitalisation of a complete electronic patient record by the NHS had brought together previously disparate clinical data that can now be linked using health informatics expertise. Developments in machine learning are promising greater in-depth analysis of large volumes of complicated infection data, unveiling hidden transmission networks and the early detection of hospital outbreaks. Projects at national, regional and hospital level have demonstrated the benefit in engaging with health informatics that will allow clinicians to better understand their local and national epidemiology, to facilitate outbreak detection and addressing increasing problems posed by AMR. During this session national and international experts will discuss the implementation of health informatics projects and how this can be translated in a meaningful way to deliver effective Infection Prevention Control.

Organisers

Dr Jasmin Islam (Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals, NHS Trust, UK) and Dr Luke Bedford (Ipswich Hospital NHS Trust, UK)

The human microbiota in health and disease - Part 1

This session is being organised by the Microbiology Society

Humans host thriving microbial communities which have been recognised since the early days of microbiology as a source of potentially lethal opportunistic pathogens and chronic infection. More recent metagenomic and metataxonomic analyses of these microbiotas, along with fluorescence microscopy, provide detailed insights into the microbes present and an indication of their relative abundance. These studies have led to a growing list of potential microbiota-health associations, from autoimmune disease to mental health and obesity. This symposium will address the microbiota in relation to infection and reflect on the evidence for selected microbiota-health associations.

Organisers

Professor Sheila Patrick (Queen’s University Belfast, UK) and Professor Craig Williams (University of the West of Scotland, UK)

Travel medicine - Part 1

This session is be organised by the National Travel Health Network and Centre

The sessions will cover current epidemiology, UK traveller cases, and factors that health professionals should consider when advising travellers for each disease. For all three diseases, there are unique challenges in terms of risk perception, risk tolerance and communication. In the case of traveller malaria, although almost completely preventable, imported cases remain a concern particularly for UK residents of African or Asian ethnicity who are non-UK born and going to visit family. For Zika, what should we advise pregnant travellers? Zika has now been reported over 80 countries and territories, but surveillance data is limited in many parts of the world. Finally, the recent case of imported rabies in a UK resident following a cat bite highlights the importance of good pre-travel advice, but also effective post exposure management.

Organisers

Dipti Patel (NaTHNaC, UK) and Dr Nick Beeching (University or Liverpool, UK)

Use of aminoglycosides – benefits and adverse effects - Part 1

This session is being organised by the British Infection Association and the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

Aminoglycosides are a critical antimicrobial option for many infections. However more recently questions are been raised as to what is the most effective dose?

Some studies suggest that the under-dosing of aminoglycosides is a concern however this needs to be balanced against the potential unintended consequences of this group of antimicrobials.

This session will explore the PK/PD of aminoglycoside use and look at the impact of conflicts in current breakpoint recommendations between the BNF and EUCAST.

The invited papers will offer an ‘into clinical practice’ perspective, showing the benefits and pitfalls of aminoglycoside use, both single and combinations therapies.

Organisers

Hiten Thaker (Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust, UK) and Dr Mark Gilchrist (Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, UK)

Big data and the future of IPC (niche themes) - Part 2

This session is being organised by the Healthcare Infection Society

The accessibility of Big Data in healthcare has opened the door to a wide variety of possibilities for infection prevention control and in antimicrobial stewardship. The drive towards digitalisation of a complete electronic patient record by the NHS had brought together previously disparate clinical data that can now be linked using health informatics expertise. Developments in machine learning are promising greater in-depth analysis of large volumes of complicated infection data, unveiling hidden transmission networks and the early detection of hospital outbreaks. Projects at national, regional and hospital level have demonstrated the benefit in engaging with health informatics that will allow clinicians to better understand their local and national epidemiology, to facilitate outbreak detection and addressing increasing problems posed by AMR. During this session national and international experts will discuss the implementation of health informatics projects and how this can be translated in a meaningful way to deliver effective Infection Prevention Control.

Organisers

Dr Jasmin Islam (Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals, NHS Trust, UK) and Dr Luke Bedford (Ipswich Hospital NHS Trust, UK)

The human microbiota in health and disease - Part 2

This session is being organised by the Microbiology Society

Humans host thriving microbial communities which have been recognised since the early days of microbiology as a source of potentially lethal opportunistic pathogens and chronic infection. More recent metagenomic and metataxonomic analyses of these microbiotas, along with fluorescence microscopy, provide detailed insights into the microbes present and an indication of their relative abundance. These studies have led to a growing list of potential microbiota-health associations, from autoimmune disease to mental health and obesity. This symposium will address the microbiota in relation to infection and reflect on the evidence for selected microbiota-health associations.

Organisers

Professor Sheila Patrick (Queen’s University Belfast, UK) and Professor Craig Williams (University of the West of Scotland, UK)

Travel Medicine - Part 2

This session is be organised by the National Travel Health Network and Centre

The sessions will cover current epidemiology, UK traveller cases, and factors that health professionals should consider when advising travellers for each disease. For all three diseases, there are unique challenges in terms of risk perception, risk tolerance and communication. In the case of traveller malaria, although almost completely preventable, imported cases remain a concern particularly for UK residents of African or Asian ethnicity who are non-UK born and going to visit family. For Zika, what should we advise pregnant travellers? Zika has now been reported over 80 countries and territories, but surveillance data is limited in many parts of the world. Finally, the recent case of imported rabies in a UK resident following a cat bite highlights the importance of good pre-travel advice, but also effective post exposure management.

Organisers

Dr Dipti Patel (NaTHNaC, UK) and Dr Nick Beeching (University or Liverpool, UK)

Use of aminoglycosides – benefits and adverse effects - Part 2

This session is being organised by the British Infection Association and the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy

Aminoglycosides are a critical antimicrobial option for many infections. However more recently questions are been raised as to what is the most effective dose?

Some studies suggest that the under-dosing of aminoglycosides is a concern however this needs to be balanced against the potential unintended consequences of this group of antimicrobials.

This session will explore the PK/PD of aminoglycoside use and look at the impact of conflicts in current breakpoint recommendations between the BNF and EUCAST.

The invited papers will offer an ‘into clinical practice’ perspective, showing the benefits and pitfalls of aminoglycoside use, both single and combinations therapies.

Organisers

Hiten Thaker (Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust, UK) and Dr Mark Gilchrist (Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, UK)

Wednesday 13 November, Afternoon

Anaerobes - Part 1

This session is being organised by the Society for Anaerobic Microbiology

Further information to follow.

Organisers

Professor Sheila Patrick (Queen’s University Belfast, UK)

Antimicrobial stewardship, the next steps - Part 1

This session is being organised by the Society for Anaerobic Microbiology

Further information to follow.

Organisers

Professor Sheila Patrick (Queen’s University Belfast, UK)

Big data and the future of IPC (niche themes) - Part 3

This session is being organised by the Healthcare Infection Society

The accessibility of Big Data in healthcare has opened the door to a wide variety of possibilities for infection prevention control and in antimicrobial stewardship. The drive towards digitalisation of a complete electronic patient record by the NHS had brought together previously disparate clinical data that can now be linked using health informatics expertise. Developments in machine learning are promising greater in-depth analysis of large volumes of complicated infection data, unveiling hidden transmission networks and the early detection of hospital outbreaks. Projects at national, regional and hospital level have demonstrated the benefit in engaging with health informatics that will allow clinicians to better understand their local and national epidemiology, to facilitate outbreak detection and addressing increasing problems posed by AMR. During this session national and international experts will discuss the implementation of health informatics projects and how this can be translated in a meaningful way to deliver effective Infection Prevention Control.

Organisers

Dr Jasmin Islam (Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals, NHS Trust, UK) and Dr Luke Bedford (Ipswich Hospital NHS Trust, UK)

Vaccine preventable diseases - Part 1

This session is being organised by Public Health England and the British Paediatric Allergy, Immunology & Infection Group

The session topic will be vaccine preventable diseases. It will focus on paediatric infections (but may also include important examples in adults eg, shingles). Topic such as meningitis / prevention and re-emergence of diseases will be covered. The organism/ disease/ diagnosis/ surveillance / vaccine programs will be covered. The notable success of reducing neonatal death following the introduction of the UK maternal pertussis programme in 2012 will be covered. The current challenges of controlling pneumococcal disease will illustrate the constant battle between vaccine and organism. Examples will be taken from the following: Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus, Poliomyelitis (polio), Measles, Mumps, Rubella, Haemophilus influenzae type b infections, Hepatitis B, Influenza, Pneumococcal infections, shingles.

Organisers

Dr Norman K. Fry (Public Health England, UK) and Dr Sanjay Patel (University Hospital Southampton UK)

Anaerobes - Part 2

This session is being organised by the Society for Anaerobic Microbiology

Further information to follow.

Organisers

Professor Sheila Patrick (Queen’s University Belfast, UK)

Antimicrobial stewardship, the next steps - Part 2

This session is being organised by the Society for Anaerobic Microbiology

Further information to follow.

Organisers

Professor Sheila Patrick (Queen’s University Belfast, UK)

Big data and the future of IPC (niche themes) - Part 4

This session is being organised by the Healthcare Infection Society

The accessibility of Big Data in healthcare has opened the door to a wide variety of possibilities for infection prevention control and in antimicrobial stewardship. The drive towards digitalisation of a complete electronic patient record by the NHS had brought together previously disparate clinical data that can now be linked using health informatics expertise. Developments in machine learning are promising greater in-depth analysis of large volumes of complicated infection data, unveiling hidden transmission networks and the early detection of hospital outbreaks. Projects at national, regional and hospital level have demonstrated the benefit in engaging with health informatics that will allow clinicians to better understand their local and national epidemiology, to facilitate outbreak detection and addressing increasing problems posed by AMR. During this session national and international experts will discuss the implementation of health informatics projects and how this can be translated in a meaningful way to deliver effective Infection Prevention Control.

Organisers

Dr Jasmin Islam (Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals, NHS Trust, UK) and Dr Luke Bedford (Ipswich Hospital NHS Trust, UK)

Vaccine preventable diseases - Part 2

This session is being organised by Public Health England and the British Paediatric Allergy, Immunology & Infection Group

The session topic will be vaccine preventable diseases. It will focus on paediatric infections (but may also include important examples in adults eg, shingles). Topic such as meningitis / prevention and re-emergence of diseases will be covered. The organism/ disease/ diagnosis/ surveillance / vaccine programs will be covered. The notable success of reducing neonatal death following the introduction of the UK maternal pertussis programme in 2012 will be covered. The current challenges of controlling pneumococcal disease will illustrate the constant battle between vaccine and organism. Examples will be taken from the following: Diphtheria, Pertussis, Tetanus, Poliomyelitis (polio), Measles, Mumps, Rubella, Haemophilus influenzae type b infections, Hepatitis B, Influenza, Pneumococcal infections, shingles.

Organisers

Dr Norman K. Fry (Public Health England, UK) and Dr Sanjay Patel (University Hospital Southampton UK)

Thursday 14 November, Morning

Infectious disease futures: trainee scientist spotlight

This session is being organised by the Microbiology Society and Public Health Wales

This session will be exclusively comprised of offered presentations by trainee scientists, and will focus on work on new initiatives to tackle infectious disease. Presenters in this session will also be considered for the Microbiology Society Infection Science award – a prize for the best presenter which provides the winners with a bursary to attend and present at the Microbiology Society Annual Conference 2020.

Organisers

Benjamin Johns (Public Health Wales, UK)

Lecture View

Tuesday 12 November

Wednesday 13 November

Abstracts and Posters

Abstract submission is now open for offered talks and poster presentations at FIS 2019 and the submission deadline is Monday 5 August 2019.

Submit your abstract


Abstracts are welcome for any of the following topics:

  • Biofilm infection
  • Antimicrobial therapy
  • Antimicrobials and antimicrobial resistance
  • Antimicrobial stewardship
  • Infection prevention
  • Tropical medicine
  • Diagnosis
  • Zoonoses
  • Travel medicine
  • Faecal microbiota transplant
  • Microbiota in health and disease
  • Vaccines and immunisation
  • Anaerobic infection
  • Medical mycology and fungal infections
  • General Bacteriology
  • Clinical Cases
  • Public Health: surveillance and epidemiology
  • Laboratory diagnostics
  • General Case reports
  • Viral infections
  • General Virology
  • Pathogenicity
  • Education and training

 

Abstracts should be submitted through the Oxford Abstracts system. Both members and non-members of the Microbiology Society are welcome to submit an abstract. Once submissions are closed, these will be reviewed by session chairs and scientific committee members and you will be informed of the outcome directly. By submitting an abstract to this conference, you are indicating to the session organisers your commitment to attend the event.

Abstract guidance

Abstracts should be a maximum of 250 words. The Society has produced a guide to give delegates some tips from the session organisers on how to write a great abstract, which can be downloaded below:

How to... write a great abstract


Please note that the abstract is the only information session organisers use when deciding whether to accept your work for presentation as an offered oral or poster. If accepted, it will also be published in the abstract book for the conference – so think carefully about what needs to be included.

Oral presentations

In order to ensure your presentation runs smoothly, you are asked to comply with the following:

  • PC versions of PowerPoint presentations are brought to the conference on a USB memory stick.
  • Mac versions of PowerPoint presentations can only be accepted if you bring your own laptop and connecting cables.
  • Please allow for three minutes Q&A following your talk in your allocated times.

Posters

Those who are presenting a poster must ensure the work is presented as below. We cannot accommodate incorrectly formatted posters during the conference.

  • Poster Size: A0 size 841mm(w) x 1189mm(h) – your poster must not exceed these measurements.
  • Poster layout MUST BE portrait orientation.
  • Posters will be displayed on poster boards measuring 1m(w) x 2m(h), one to a side.
  • Posters can ONLY be fixed by Velcro (provided at conference).
  • Your poster number will be sent prior to the conference.

New for 2019: Microbiology Society Infection Science Award

The Microbiology Society Infection Science Award is an exchange scheme that facilitates the most promising trainee and early career presenters from FIS to present at the Microbiology Society Annual Conference Infection Forum in an effort to improve the exchange of ideas and the career development of early career researchers and trainee scientists and doctors.

Eligibility

All self-defining early career and trainee presenters are eligible for the scheme. As a guide, the Microbiology Society’s ECM Forum considers you an early career microbiologist if you’re an undergraduate or postgraduate student, or within five years of appointment to your first position after your highest degree earned. However, if this doesn’t fit your situation and you consider yourself an early career researcher, you are welcome to join.

All presenters are welcome to enter the competition, regardless of membership of organising societies. 

Selection of awardees

A judging panel will attend the session to judge the entrants and select the awardees for announcement in the weeks following FIS2019. The judges will focus on scientific content and communication and will criteria related to the translation potential of research outlined in presentations.

Award amount

The awardees will be provided with a set bursary of £400 to contribute to travel, accommodation and registration as the awardee sees fit.

Entering the competition

To enter the competition, submit your abstract to the Infectious Disease Futures session and provide an additional statement about how the award will benefit your professional development.

Destination & Venue


Destination Edinburgh

Edinburgh is Scotland’s capital city and provides plenty of attractions, lots of history and a superb infrastructure to welcome visitors throughout the year making it the obvious destination for FIS 2019.

It is also globally recognised as a world-leading authority in the sciences, technology and education and home to more than 3,000 researchers and 100 market-leading companies who provide a major platform for Scotland’s science and technology sector – a sector that continues to lead the world.

You can find out more about Edinburgh by visiting the Convention Edinburgh website.

EICC 

The Conference will take place at the Edinburgh International Conference Centre (EICC).

Edinburgh International Conference Centre 
The Exchange 
Edinburgh 
EH3 8EE 
General enquiries: +44(0)131 300 3000

Accommodation & Travel

Edinburgh is a popular destination city whose hotels fill up quickly. So, if you're planning on joining us for FIS 2019, we highly recommend you secure your accommodation and make your travel plans as early as possible. 

Accommodation

To support you in securing your accommodation we provide links to our booking and accommodation services via Reservation Highway. This travel and venue agency have secured negotiated rates at hotels to suit a broad range of budgets. A booking form and hotel list is available below for those who prefer not to book online.

Hotel List & Booking Form for FIS 2019

 

If you require any further information for personal or group hotel bookings, please call 01423 525577 (during office hours) or email admin@reservation-highway.co.uk at any time.

Travel 

By car

If you are travelling using a sat nav, please use the postcode EH3 8EE. The main entrance is on Morrison Street.

By air

Edinburgh International Airport is within 6 miles of the EICC. The Airlink 100 runs between Edinburgh Airport and the city centre every 10 minutes at peak times, with the journey taking 20 minutes. This service starts at 4.30am and runs until 12.22am. Tickets cost £3.50 single and £6.00 return. Delegates are advised to disembark at Haymarket Railway Station and to follow signs for EICC on foot (5-minute walk).

The N22 bus also departs from the Airport and runs every 30 minutes through the night until the Airlink service starts again. For more information about these services, visit the Lothian Buses website.

EICC has an established relationship with Virgin Atlantic, who can offer discounted flights between Edinburgh and London on their new service, Virgin Atlantic Little Red. For more information on discounted flights, visit the Virgin Atlantic website.

By rail

Edinburgh has two railway stations – Waverley and Haymarket. Waverley is the main station, with direct routes to many cities across the UK. For more information on travelling by rail to Edinburgh, visit the London North Eastern Railway or the National Rail websites.

Virgin Trains

Virgin Trains offer discounted group travel for groups of between three and nine passengers travelling together. This currently stands at a 20% discount off Advance tickets booked through their website – for more information, visit the group tickets page of their website.

By bus

Edinburgh's main bus terminal is located at St Andrews Square. Visit Lothian Buses for more information on local bus services.

Coach

For information about travel by coach please visit the National Express website.

Car parking

There are many car parks within close walking distance of the EICC. Please see the EICC website for more details.

Exhibition and Sponsorship

Exhibiting at this event will offer you an unique opportunity to interact with some of the best and most thoughtful minds working on important current issues facing infectious disease control, prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

Whether your aim is to connect with key contacts and generate business leads, or host an industry sponsored session to inform and encourage debate, we have a range of packages to suit. Download our exhibitor pack below or contact exhibitions@microbiologysociety.org

Platinum sponsors

Exhibitors

 

Shionogi Inc

 

Abbott Laboratories